Create an air of calm with the world's second favourite colour - green

PUBLISHED: 09:18 07 March 2013 | UPDATED: 19:26 02 April 2013

Glow Brick, £20. Recharges using natural light, glows at night Greenstamp, Newquay greenstamp.co.uk

Glow Brick, £20. Recharges using natural light, glows at night Greenstamp, Newquay greenstamp.co.uk

Calming, a symbol of safety and the world's second favourite colour – there are many reasons to surround yourself with green. Alexandra Richards reveals more about this mysterious shade


The greEn

wing

Calming, a symbol of safety and the worlds second favourite colour there are many reasons to surround yourself with green. Alexandra Richards reveals more about this mysterious shade

Green is the prime colour of the world, and that from which its loveliness arises, wrote the Spanish dramatist and poet Pedro Calderon de la Barca. The primary colour of the natural world, green is the ideal hue for interior design as we are so used to seeing it as a lifes natural backdrop. It is a fascinating colour, too one steeped in superstition, mystery and meaning.

Green is the chosen colour for night vision goggles as the human eye is most sensitive to and can discern more shades of green than any other colour. Green has an interesting place in history and legend: in ancient China there existed a secret colour, called mi se pronounced mee-ser only found on a particular type of porcelain. This fading autumnal green celadon was perceived to be so sacred that only royalty could own it, and it is thought that the simplicity of this porcelain against the prevalent gold and silver of the dynasty made it more special, like a sorbet to the glutted palatte. Another green mystery is that of the wallpaper in Napoleons rooms during his exile on Saint Helena. Scheeles Green, a dye made of copper arsenite and used by British manufacturers, has often been alleged as the cause of Napoleons demise at the hand of his British enemies, through arsenic poisoning.*

When used in interior design, green can achieve different aesthetic effects. Grey greens (which look great combined with forest green detailing) are ideal for recreating a Regency style perfect in homes with large windows and high ceilings to reflect the maximum amount of light. A turquoise-based hue, when accessorized with white linens and multicoloured cushions, will bring notes of the Mediterranean and will evoke a feeling of holiday warmth all year round. For a contemporary, striking look, try using splashes of lime alongside neutral tones like white and pale grey. Zesty colours, when employed in restrained amounts such as in art, accessories, subtle tiling or perhaps some repainted furniture will make a visual statement and give your home added interest, without requiring any grand changes.

Choosing green for your home may even have underlying health benefits it helps you to relax, mentally and physically; it can lessen anxiety and nervousness; it is restful for the eyes; and can offer a sense of hope, self control and renewal. Eternally associated with nature, the colour of optimism, safety and growth, green is an inspiring and calming shade; the perfect choice to transform your home into a relaxing environment.

*Source: Colour by Victoria Finlay. Published by Hodder and Stoughton.

Tint Hints from Farrow & Ball

This season demands soothing and rejuvenating greens, perfect for a fresh spring look. Accentuate budding exteriors by continuing the green hues inside your entrance hallway. Harness zesty limes to create an exhilarating scheme; use grey greens for a tonal, restful atmosphere or for a retro feel, opt for yellowy greens. For a look inspired by spring-time with an urban twist, try using soft greens paired with earthy browns; the introduction of chemical shades is key to getting this look right. Use a dazzling spearmint green on furniture or accessories for a flash of vivid colour. Think rural luxury meets city living.

Sarah Cole, Director

Farrow & Ball, farrow-ball.com

No. 18 French Gray

No. 251 Churlish Green

No. 214 Arsenic

Did you know?

l The Chromium content in emeralds gives them their vivid colour

l The egg of an emu is bright green

l In Japan, green is regarded as the colour of eternal life

l Andy Warhol would allegedly wear only green-coloured underpants

l There is an old nautical superstition that green will bring bad luck to a boat and its crew

l US President George Washingtons favourite colour was green

l Green is a sacred colour in Iran, symbolising paradise

l After blue, green is the second favourite colour worldwide

l People used to wear green as a mark of honour in Scotland


The Green Wing


Calming, a symbol of safety and the worlds second favourite colour there are many reasons to surround yourself with green. Alexandra Richards reveals more about this mysterious shade

Green is the prime colour of the world, and that from which its loveliness arises, wrote the Spanish dramatist and poet Pedro Calderon de la Barca. The primary colour of the natural world, green is the ideal hue for interior design as we are so used to seeing it as a lifes natural backdrop. It is a fascinating colour, too one steeped in superstition, mystery and meaning.

Green is the chosen colour for night vision goggles as the human eye is most sensitive to and can discern more shades of green than any other colour. Green has an interesting place in history and legend: in ancient China there existed a secret colour, called mi se pronounced mee-ser only found on a particular type of porcelain. This fading autumnal green celadon was perceived to be so sacred that only royalty could own it, and it is thought that the simplicity of this porcelain against the prevalent gold and silver of the dynasty made it more special, like a sorbet to the glutted palatte. Another green mystery is that of the wallpaper in Napoleons rooms during his exile on Saint Helena. Scheeles Green, a dye made of copper arsenite and used by British manufacturers, has often been alleged as the cause of Napoleons demise at the hand of his British enemies, through arsenic poisoning.*When used in interior design, green can achieve different aesthetic effects. Grey greens (which look great combined with forest green detailing) are ideal for recreating a Regency style perfect in homes with large windows and high ceilings to reflect the maximum amount of light. A turquoise-based hue, when accessorized with white linens and multicoloured cushions, will bring notes of the Mediterranean and will evoke a feeling of holiday warmth all year round. For a contemporary, striking look, try using splashes of lime alongside neutral tones like white and pale grey. Zesty colours, when employed in restrained amounts such as in art, accessories, subtle tiling or perhaps some repainted furniture will make a visual statement and give your home added interest, without requiring any grand changes.

Choosing green for your home may even have underlying health benefits it helps you to relax, mentally and physically; it can lessen anxiety and nervousness; it is restful for the eyes; and can offer a sense of hope, self control and renewal. Eternally associated with nature, the colour of optimism, safety and growth, green is an inspiring and calming shade; the perfect choice to transform your home into a relaxing environment.*Source: Colour by Victoria Finlay. Published by Hodder and Stoughton.

Tint Hints from Farrow & Ball
This season demands soothing and rejuvenating greens, perfect for a fresh spring look. Accentuate budding exteriors by continuing the green hues inside your entrance hallway. Harness zesty limes to create an exhilarating scheme; use grey greens for a tonal, restful atmosphere or for a retro feel, opt for yellowy greens. For a look inspired by spring-time with an urban twist, try using soft greens paired with earthy browns; the introduction of chemical shades is key to getting this look right. Use a dazzling spearmint green on furniture or accessories for a flash of vivid colour.
Think rural luxury meets city living.Sarah Cole, DirectorFarrow & Ball, farrow-ball.com
No. 18 French Gray
No. 251 Churlish Green
No. 214 Arsenic


Did you know?

The Chromium content in emeralds gives them their vivid colour
The egg of an emu is bright green
In Japan, green is regarded as the colour of eternal life
Andy Warhol would allegedly wear only green-coloured underpants
There is an old nautical superstition that green will bring bad luck to a boat and its crew
US President George Washingtons favourite colour was green
Green is a sacred colour in Iran, symbolising paradise
After blue, green is the second favourite colour worldwide
People used to wear green as a mark of honour in Scotland

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