Cornwall Life visits Bodmin... Our Town

PUBLISHED: 12:47 05 January 2011 | UPDATED: 11:54 28 February 2013

Cornwall Life visits Bodmin... Our Town

Cornwall Life visits Bodmin... Our Town

A bustling town, Bodmin is steeped in history and surrounded by beautiful countryside and Bodmin Moor. Lesley Double asks some of the locals why they love the area

A bustling town, Bodmin is steeped in history and surrounded by beautiful countryside and Bodmin Moor. Lesley Double asks some of the locals why they love the area


Bodmin is the largest town in north Cornwall and is centrally situated 19km from either coast. It lies just on the south-western edge of the wild and exciting Bodmin Moor. When the assizes were moved there in 1836, Bodmin was named the county town of Cornwall. The courts closed in 1988 and were moved to Truro, now the base for the newly formed Cornwall County Council. When this happened, many of Bodmins beautiful old Georgian and Victorian buildings that formed the business centre of the town fell into disrepair. In recent years, these buildings have been extensively refurbished: the old Shire Hall, once the courthouse, is now home to the Tourist Information Centre, for example. A medium-to-long-term project is under way to revitalise the town, aiming to capitalise on Bodmins historic inheritance, while encouraging investment from businesses that wish to start up or relocate to the area.

Wendy Wright, Debbie Noyce and Claire Trudgeon work in the Tourist Information Centre.
Bodmin is a perfect town to come on holiday, says Wendy. It is close to the coast and the Moor, and there are so many places to visit within a very short distance. I love going out on Bodmin Moor, especially walking around Minions or Rough Tor. Its so peaceful. Bodmin is also on the Camel Trail, so if you like cycling, you can ride all the way from here to Padstow.


Bodmin is on the Camel Trail, so if you like cycling, you can ride all the way from here to Padstow


Theres so much history attached to Bodmin, says Debbie. Theres the Museum and Gaol, and the Bodmin and Wenford Steam Railway is very popular. The Gaol has a very good restaurant, and we like going to the Steak and Thai Restaurant at the Westbury too.
I like walking around the gardens at Lanhydrock, adds Claire. And if you have children, Creely at Wadebridge isnt too far away. We are also close to the Eden Project.

Tony and Pam Tippett (with friends Ivor Hooper, Terry Treleaven and Elizabeth Carvill)
We love living here, says Pam. Bodmin people are really friendly and look after their own.
Well always make you a cup of tea! laughs Elizabeth.
It can be tricky if you are in a wheelchair, though, says Tony, who is disabled.
Im really interested in the town, especially the old buildings. I cant wait to see what Cornwall County Council is going to do with them, adds Pam.

Sam Rice (enjoying a cream tea with
her dog, Alfie) works for the Ambulance Service.

I live in Newquay, but work in Bodmin, says Sam. I work 12-hour shifts, so at the end of a long day, or on my day off, Alfie and I like to come to Cardinham Woods. Its right on the edge of Bodmin.


Cardinham Woods is quite lovely, and I can easily spend the whole day here, just getting away from it all


One minute you can be in the town and the next you can be surrounded by trees. Its quite lovely, and I can easily spend the whole day here, just getting away from it all. Its a place for everyone: theres the fabulous Woods Caf, parks for children to play and miles of walks where you can be completely on your own.

Pat and Sylvia McCann volunteer at Bodmin Museum. I have worked here for three years, says Sylvia, and persuaded my husband to come along and join me. Its a beautiful old building and holds some fascinating artefacts too. The Museum is on the site of Bodmins Franciscan friary and entry is free. Children love the wild animals that can be found on the Moor and adults are interested in the Victorian kitchen and stories of the County Lunatic Asylum, which is now known as St Lawrences Hospital.


You are only five minutes away from many lovely walks



Bodmin is a lovely town, full of history, says Pat. I wish it had a cinema as an added attraction for our young people, but we enjoy living here and it was great when the children were growing up. I come from Ireland and some of the coastal scenery in Cornwall is very similar to what I knew over there. We visit friends out of Cornwall, but always cheer when we come back over the Tamar.
You are only five minutes away from many lovely walks, agrees Sylvia, but I like showing people around the town itself. There are so many buildings to admire.

How to get there


By road: Bodmin lies close to the main A30 through Cornwall and also the A38 to Plymouth.
By rail: Bodmin Parkway station (PL30) is managed by First Great Western and is on the main railway line between Penzance and Plymouth. The Bodmin & Wenford Railway runs from Bodmin General to Bodmin Parkway and Boscarne Junction and is Cornwalls only full-size railway operated by steam locomotives.

By bus: Bodmin is blessed with nearly 20 different regular bus and coach services, including buses from various operators to St Austell (service 529), Truro (260), Liskeard (593) and Padstow (555), and National Express coaches to Portsmouth, Nottingham and London.
By air: Newquay Airport is less than 20km from Bodmin. Private pilots can use Bodmin Airfield, 6km north-east of the town on the edge of Bodmin Moor.

Latest Articles

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

Most Read

A+ Education

It's Christmas

Great British Holidays

South West Attractions

Pure Weddings E-edition