Cornwall Life visits Lands End... Our peninsula

PUBLISHED: 12:48 05 January 2011 | UPDATED: 17:37 20 February 2013

The cliffs at Land's End

The cliffs at Land's End

Land's End peninsula is a popular tourist attraction and the base for many people's adventures from here to John O'Groats. Lesley Double speaks to some of the locals about its particular appeal

Lands End peninsula is a popular tourist attraction and the base for many peoples adventures from here to John OGroats. Lesley Double speaks to some of the locals about its particular appeal

Today we think of Lands End as a tourist attraction, but it has been one for almost 200 years, first bringing holidaymakers by horse and carriage along the roads from Penzance, but now they come mainly by car and coach, with visitors coming to this piece of land from all over the world. Since 1980 various owners have done much to improve and smarten up the area, rebuilding and repainting, making pathways and clearing streams, even achieving environmental awards for their work.
There are various museums and shops on the site, including the base for the famous End-to-End route, which highlights the many exhausting, exhilarating and diverse ways people have travelled the highways and byways between Lands End and John OGroats. Lands End supports local fundraising ventures, which usually take place during the summer months: Air Sea Rescue Day is on 29 July and Air Ambulance Day is on 26 August. Every Tuesday and Thursday evening in August, there are Magic in the Skies Firework Spectaculars, which take place at dusk. There is also live music from bands such as the Cornish Wurzles and Not The Beatles.

Brian Wood is the Maintenance Manager and First Aider and has worked at Lands End for 30 years. I often come out here in the evenings after work to watch the sunset. Theres no better place to watch it than from here. The views are lovely in the summer, but in the winter, when theres a storm 10 blowing, and waves and spray are crashing right over the lighthouse, they are spectacular.


We frequently see a Cornish chough on the cliffs


Ive worked here for a long time and there have been a lot of changes. The pathways have made a lot of difference. Its allowed for all kinds of wildlife to flourish, especially birds and flowers. We frequently see a Cornish chough on the cliffs.

Peter Puddiphatt works for 15 days a month at The Signpost, taking photos of visitors, which is probably one of the most famous attractions at Lands End. Its a pleasure to be here, to see the different colours of the sea and cliffs, and I meet lots of interesting people. Ive only been open for half an hour today, but Ive already met people from Australia, Canada, New Zealand and Italy.


Its a pleasure to be here, to see the different colours of the sea and cliffs, and I meet interesting people


If its quiet, I look out to sea for basking sharks and dolphins, and watch the birds swooping over the cliffs. Sometimes people say there are too many people here, but I tell them to walk a couple of hundred yards either side of Lands End and the countryside and sea views are stunning and you can be completely on your own.

Victoria Brickstock lives in St Buryan and has two children, Laura and Josh. There are lots of things to do at Lands End, especially if you have children. We went to the new 4D theatre recently and the children loved it! We had to wear special 3D glasses to watch the film, The Curse of Skull Rock, and our seats rocked about and we were splashed with water and blasted with air too!


There are lots of things to do at Lands End, especially if you have children


There was plenty of laughter and shrieking in the audience.

Helen Jaggard lives in Newbridge, between St Just and Penzance. She is a member of Cape Cornwall Gig Club, and is a Sennen Cove Lifeboat crewmember. I go to Lands End occasionally but I usually see it from the sea, either in the lifeboat or while gig rowing. It is peaceful out there.


I think more people should experience Lands End from the sea. It looks so different from out there


Terry, the lifeboat coxswain, knows so much. He knows where all the rocks are, which ones are hidden at high tide, and their names. Sometimes out in the gig, basking sharks have surrounded us. I think more people should experience Lands End from the sea. It looks so different from out there.

Charlotte Dudley is the manager of Sennen and Lands End Play and Toddler Group and is also a childminder. She is pictured with Sally Baker-Jones, Playgroup Assistant and two Playgroup children. This year the Playgroup summer trip is to Greeb Farm, a small animal farm on the south of the Lands End site.


Walk from Sennen Cove to Lands End along the coast path and have a picnic in the park


There are lots of animals there and sometimes you are allowed to feed them. There is a 200-year-old farmhouse and craft workshops too. The children I childmind love going there as well and, if the weathers good, well walk from Sennen Cove to Lands End along the coast path and have a picnic in the park before walking home again.

Gina Salmon (pictured with her two dogs Ruby and Rosie) lives with her family and pets on the cliffs above Gwynver beach. I frequently walk our two dogs along the cliff path between Sennen and Nanjizal. Its my favourite walk and the path goes through Lands End. Whenever we have friends to stay they always want to go to Lands End.


Theres so much to do and see, you could be at Lands End all day


Theres so much to do and see, you could be there all day! There are plenty of places where you can have something to eat. Two of our children, Hannah and Paul, worked at Lands End during the summer holidays in the Cornish Pantry, a self-service cafeteria, and theres also The Old Bakehouse takeaway, the Lands End Hotel and Longships Bar.

Latest Articles

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

Most Read

A+ Education

It's Christmas

Great British Holidays

South West Attractions

Pure Weddings E-edition