Details

  • Start: Pentire
  • End: Pentire
  • Country: England
  • County: Cornwall
  • Type: Beach
  • Nearest pub: Pubs and cafes in New Polzeath.
  • Ordnance Survey: Ordnance Survey Explorer 106
  • Difficulty: Medium
Google Map

Description

This is a longish walk (around eight miles) on the spectacular north coast and within the Widemouth to Pentire section of the Cornwall Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, writes Pete Maxted

A longish walk with spectacular north coast views


This is a longish walk (around eight miles) on the spectacular north coast and within the Widemouth to Pentire section of the Cornwall Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, writes Pete Maxted


We started this walk at Port Quinn but if you are coming by public transport (or bike) then the ferry from Padstow comes in about half way round the route.


Information


Distance: 8.2 miles
Exertion: Moderate/Strenuous.
Points of Interest: Port Quinn, Dowden Castle, The Rumps, the Bee Centre.
Terrain: Coast path with a couple of steep climbs and descents, footpaths inland, minor roads.
Child/dog friendly: No dogs in summer on Polzeath beaches. Steep cliffs. Sheep grazing.
Start: Port Quinn car park
Map: Ordnance Survey Explorer 106
Refreshments: Pubs and cafes in New Polzeath.
Bus: See http://www.cornwallpublictransport.info/bus_timetables.asp for information to Padstow then ferry.
Train: Nearest station is Bodmin Parkway.
By bike: Camel Trail to Padstow then ferry.


Ordnance Survey Mapping Crown copyright Media 045/12


1 Begin at the little National Trust car park in Port Quinn. The village, with its natural harbour, has a strange atmosphere, very quiet and with a somewhat sad air. I found out later that it is sometimes referred to as the village that died - all of the men were lost at sea in the 19th Century and the women then abandoned their homes.


2 Follow the coast path through a field (chock full of sheep when we were there), out onto the coast itself and take a detour out to Doyden Castle, a 19th Century folly built on Doyden Point. The story goes that a local businessman, Samuel Symons, built it as a retreat where he indulged in pleasures he was not permitted at home.


3 Follow the coast path west to Lundy Beach and spectacular Lundy Hole, a collapsed sea cave just to the west of the beach. The path is now mostly on top of the cliffs all the way to the Rumps a rocky outcrop with the remains of an IronAge fort. Excavations have shown the fort once had stone-faced ramparts and circular houses. Pottery found there was made from clay from the Lizard. Look out to the two offshore islands, Sevensouls and the Mouls.


4 Round Pentire Point (John Betjemans Rough Pentire) and there are great views across the Doom Bar (responsible, as the name suggests, for many wrecks) to Padstow and up the Camel Estuary section of the AONB. Follow the path running at the top of the sandy beach then turn inland just before the surf school. Turn left at the little road then, at the cross roads, right onto another footpath. Just past the campsite turn left onto the road.


5 Now theres a couple of miles of road walking. Turn right at the T-junction, then left at the next one. When the road bends right theres a little path straight ahead. Stop at the Bee Centre to take in the Living Honey Bee Exhibition and buy a couple of jars. Turn left at the road and follow it downhill back to Port Quinn. See www.cornwall-aonb.gov.uk for further walks and details of the 12 sections of the AONB.

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