Gastro Gossip

PUBLISHED: 00:16 23 March 2011 | UPDATED: 19:04 20 February 2013

Gastro Gossip

Gastro Gossip

What's cooking in Cornwall's kitchens and what's the county's latest food news?

Whats cooking in Cornwalls kitchens and whats the countys latest food news?



THE GENUINE 'CORNISH PASTY'


Food fans will not have missed the excellent news that the humble Cornish pasty has finally been awarded Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) status. From now on, only Cornish pasties made in Cornwall that are produced to a traditional recipe can be called Cornish pasties.



According to the Cornish Pasty Association (CPA), a genuine Cornish pasty has a D shape and is crimped on one side, never on the top. The texture of the filling is chunky, made up of uncooked mince or beef (not less than 12.5%), swede, potato, onion and a light seasoning. The pastry casing is golden, savoury, glazed with milk or egg and robust enough to retain its shape throughout the cooking process. It is slow-baked and no artificial flavourings or additives must be used.


David Rodda (pictured), spokesperson for the CPA, says: By protecting our regional food heritage, we are protecting local jobs. Thousands of people in Cornwall are involved in the pasty industry, from farmers to producers, and its important that the products quality is protected for future generations.

SHARP INCREASE IN BREWING CAPACITY



Award-winning Cornish brewer, Sharps Brewery, has taken delivery of two new fermenting vessels, which will increase its brewing capacity by 1,100 firkins, to produce a further 300 brewers barrels each week. The equipment investment, worth around 125,000, is evidence of the planned continued growth for the Rock-based brewer.
Stuart Howe, Head Brewer at Sharps Brewery, says: This is an exciting time for the brewery. It means planned growth for Doom Bar and the other Sharps beer brands can now be supported.
Stuart continues: We have ambitious plans for Doom Bar: wed like it to be one of the top three cask beers in the UK in the future and this increase in capacity will help us get there, as well as ensuring we can brew all the Sharps beers drinkers know and love. An order for 2,000 new casks has also been placed.

NEW-LOOK HUB



St Ives popular bar and grill The Hub has a new menu, along with an interior refurbishment. Owner Richard Boon says that its about simple and uncomplicated food using the best seasonal ingredients and includes a range of handmade, freshly cooked burgers, with classic beef, chicken and vegetarian options available, fresh salads and steak, along with a kids menu and daily specials.



During the day, the Hub has also introduced a range of freshly baked cakes, brownies, cookies and pastries to complement the coffee, made from the Hubs team of fully trained baristas. The Hub is a destination where people come to relax and we wanted the new menu to reflect that, so the approach has been to focus on simplicity freshness, flavour and taste. Weve have spent months devising the best recipe for our burgers to get them just right right down to having the buns made to our specific requirements. Weve also decided to take a more classic British approach to some of our daily specials, with dishes including a range of homemade soups, sausage and mash, liver and onions, and homemade scotch eggs, with hand-cut chips and mushy peas, says Richard.

USING ITS LOAF



A small Scorrier-based baker, Prima Bakeries, has launched six new Cornish sliced bread lines. The company believes its the only Cornish producer and distributor of Cornish sliced loaves to retail customers across the county. All are handmade by bakers. We are doing something genuinely very different and beneficial on a number of fronts, supporting Cornish jobs, increasing customer choice locally and definitely competing with the big boys in the process! said Prima Managing Director, Mark Norton.
The six new sliced bread products include three sandwich loaves white, multigrain and wholemeal, described as ideal for the lunchbox and sandwiches because of their square slices. The three farmhouse loaves, of the same varieties, have a rounded top and are slightly more crusty, making a more artisan, craft-looking loaf.

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