Newquay Zoo's Baby Boom, Cornwall

PUBLISHED: 12:01 12 April 2010 | UPDATED: 17:00 20 February 2013

Newquay Zoo's Baby Boom, Cornwall

Newquay Zoo's Baby Boom, Cornwall

Baby Boom at Newquay Zoo<br/><br/><br/><br/>Newquay Zoo has seen something of a baby boom in recent weeks, Sulawesi Crested Black Macaques, Ring-tailed Lemurs, Meerkats and Philippines Spotted Deer have all been giving birth – a sure sign that spring has arrived.

Baby Boom at Newquay Zoo


Newquay Zoo has seen something of a baby boom in recent weeks, Sulawesi Crested Black Macaques, Ring-tailed Lemurs, Meerkats and Philippines Spotted Deer have all been giving birth a sure sign that spring has arrived.


John Meek, Animal Collections Manager says of the births, The sudden rate of births at the Zoo has been absolutely wonderful! We are especially pleased with how the Sulawesi Crested Black Macaque breeding programme is going. These animals are critically endangered and we have successfully bred two males and a female in the last few months. The main benefit of successfully breeding females is that they can then breed themselves the group becomes a great family with new youngsters having aunts just as they would in the wild.


The Ring-tailed Lemurs and Philippines Spotted Deer are another great achievement. Philippines Spotted Deer are also endangered in the wild as their natural habitat is under threat due to deforestation and agricultural developments.


John says of the Deer, The Philippines fawn is very cute we hear a lot of aaahs from visitors when she is out.


Newquay Zoo works with a number of Zoos from around the world in countries such as, The Philippines, Indonesia and Vietnam to support the protection of endangered species. To find out more visit www.newquayzoo.org.uk


Ring-tailed Lemurs


Status: Vulnerable
Range: Southern Madagascar
Habitat: Dry forest
Diet: Fruit and berries


Ring tail lemurs weigh roughly 3 to 3.5 Kg.


This species of lemur is highly social and can be found in groups of 3 to 25 individuals. Ring tail lemurs have different predator calls so that the group knows whether the attack is from the ground or air. This species has been declared vulnerable by the IUCN due to habitat destruction.


Sulawesi Crested Black Macaques


Status: Endangered
Range: Indonesia, Islands of Sulawesi and Bacon.
Habitat: forest
Diet: Fruit, buds and insects.


The Sulawesi Crested Macaque is easily identified by an elongated snout, black fur and a crest of punkish hair that occurs with both sexes. Groups tend to consist of 5 to 25 members but can reach 100 when troops merge. Females tend to stay with the family group for their whole life, whereas males will change groups frequently. They communicate by calls and well-developed facial expressions. Sulawesi Crested Macaques are taken from the wild by humans for the food trade and as pets in Indonesia.


Philippines Spotted Deer


Status: Endangered
Range: Phillipines
Habitat: Primary forest
Diet:
Grasses, leaves & buds


A short legged and stocky deer endemic to the Visayan Islands, located in the central Philippines. They are the most narrowly distributed species of deer in the world. Although a small deer, males are bigger than the females and have short horns. Both grow creamy white fur under their belly and chin.


Despite being protected in the wild, spotted deer are still hunted and so their future is very uncertain


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